DAILY NEWS (part 3)

EZIO BOSSO

WARREN BENFIELD

BEFORE THE DOUBLE BASS

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TOM MARTIN and TIM COBB

FRANCO PETRACCHI

SILVIO DALLA TORRE

ALBERTO BOCINI

ALESSANDRO SERRA

TOM MARTIN in GENEVA

BASSIONE AMOROSA

CONCERTO IN F# by Bottesini

Bottesini - Concerto no.1 in Fa_ minore
Documento Adobe Acrobat 4.7 MB

CHRISTINE HOOK

DAVIDE BOTTO

DUNCAN MCTIER

EDICSON RUIZ

FEDERICO BAGNASCO

JOHN FEENEY

Grancino Editions' Dragonetti editor, John Feeney and the Loma Mar Quartet have recorded Dragonetti's Quintet no. 18 in C major, together with Quartet no. 1 in F major, Quintet no. 31 in D major, and Quintet no. 31 in C minor on this world-premier CD. Through stylish performances using period instruments, Feeney and his colleagues bring Dragonetti's forgotten chamber music to the fore, showcasing them as musical gems of the 19th century.

GUNTHER KLAUS plays FRANCAIX

HECTOR TIRADO

DVD

HISTORY

The prestige of an instrument is very much dependent on its ability to perform as a solo instrument. But is the double bass a solo instrument - or, more precisely, is the double bass also a solo instrument? – since it is com-
pletely clear that solo performance on the
largest of the bowed string instruments is not
the principal reason for its existence.

The question must undoubtedly be answered "Yes!" The extensive solo literature from several centuries on its own justifies this answer. However, examination of the quality of this material sadly yields the perception that the great composers, apart from a few exceptions, have not been particularly drawn to create compositions such as concertos, sonatas, etc. for double bass solo. There are no Mozart or Beethoven sonatas, no works by Schubert or Schumann, still less a concerto by Mendelssohn, Dvorak, Elgar or Richard Strauss for double bass solo.

So perhaps the question should rather be whether the double bass makes a good solo instrument. A committed adherent of the instrument would like to answer "Yes" immediately, and to cite the great virtuosi of the past and their phenomenal success. But in the first place, even these had their off days when they were not so very convincing – thus, for example, it was reported in 1802 in a review of a performance by Johann Matthias Sperger of two concerti that he had "delivered more than can be expected from an instrument that is not built for playing solo". And then there is the fact that only a tiny percentage of players are capable of shining as solo performers, so this can hardly taken as evidence for the suitability of the double bass as a solo instrument.

Why for example did Bottesini, who had excellent contacts with the greatest composers of his time, not incite them to create solo literature for the double bass? Perhaps because he himself was not interested in other people´s compositions? (He played exclusively his own pieces, which he had written to suit his capabilities.) But perhaps also because it would not have been interesting for the composers if nobody other than Bottesini had been able to play the works. Or was it because the tonal and musical possibilities of the double bass did not satisfy them?

Much has changed since then. Bottesini´s pieces, which were for a long time considered virtually unplayable, are now almost a standard element of courses at music universities. There is an abundance of recordings of practically the whole double bass solo repertoire, more new works are being written for the instrument than ever before – and still the double bass is not established on the concert platform, and remains a curiosity as a solo instrument.

Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen (1946-2005)
In jazz, it is a different matter. There, the solo double bass has become established as a fully equal partner of saxophone, guitar, trumpet, trombone and piano. Double bass playing in
jazz (and electric bass playing as well!) has undergone a dramatic transformation since the days when a bass solo could be recognised from the fact that there was nothing to be heard besides the typical hi-hat beat except some sort of low rumbling noise. Of course, modern amplification plays a significant role here, but
the principal reason is that many jazz bassists have established themselves by means of their tremendous skills.

So what are the differences between solo playing in jazz and classical solo performance?

1. The plucked jazz bass sounds fuller, more "bassy" than the bowed double bass, which usually has a nasal quality in its sound, something rough and brittle, and also has little carrying power.

2. Jazz bassists are often much more unconventional in their technique. As impro-
vising musicians, they are not oriented to any studies or Etudes, but rather to
their own imagination, and to top-class melodies. Anyone who wants to play Charlie Parker´s "Donna Lee", for example, has to think about the real aim of the exercise rather than about what is possible.

3. The jazz bass does not have to play high the whole time. It can present itself as what it is, and thus shine in every register.

I believe that the classical double bass is just as much capable of development as the jazz bass. However, this will depend on a fundamental discussion of the musical requirements, playing techniques, and many of the accepted practices.

OK, the double bass doesn´t change colour like
a chameleon, but it has been through more
transformations in the course of its development
than any other instrument. The different meth-
ods of tuning, the number of strings – and thus
the compass of the instrument – its size and the
nature of its construction, and the different tech-
niques for playing it. And last but not least, its
many names: all of this indicates how the term
"double bass" describes more a family of instru-
ments than a single specific member.

Names used for the largest of the bowed string
instruments include both those such as Bass Viol de Braccio, Bass-Geig de braccio, Grossbass-
geige
and Groß-Quint-Baß, which in the opinion
of some experts point to kinship with the violin,
and others which seem to speak more of mem-
bership of the viol family: Viola grande, Subbass, Violone grosso, Contrabasso di viola, Contraviolon, Basse de viole, Violone grande, to list but a few of those that derive from the early history of the instrument. All of these designated thoroughly different instruments that nevertheless, because of their common features, belong to the category "double bass".

In addition to the variety of its forms, the double bass may also be the most universally used instrument, appearing as it does in almost all the genres and styles of European and North and South American musical culture.

It is to be found in the classical symphony orchestra and in the rockabilly band,
in the palm court orchestra and in the avant garde ensemble, in pop groups and in the Baroque orchestra, in chamber music groups and in Tango ensembles, in Alpine and in bluegrass, in Klezmer and in the blues band.

An indispensable member of the jazz band, where it has in America been known since the 30s by the affectionately mocking name "doghouse". There, it has written musical history with the "walking bass", those bass note sequences, almost exclusively plucked – or slapped - which are in essence nothing other than the "basso continuo" of jazz, and with the swing rhythm without which modern musical life is unthinkable.

The double bass is needed in almost all types of music – and is nevertheless tolerated rather than welcomed. 

The repertoire of original compositions for bassetto is easy to summarise. Besides the compositions of the Italian Baroque from Mazzaferrata, Chierico, Grossi, Colombi and Filippini which prescribe the participation of a bassetto, there is the chamber music work "Hymne pour dixtuor à cordes" by Arthur Honegger and a few own compositions by Alfred Stelzner for a bass instrument tuned G-D-A-E. The only historical solo piece which is known to me is Honegger´s "Prélude pour la Sous-Basse". In 2004, the composer Bodo Reinke of Rendsburg added to this the work 10-10+10=10? for bassetto and piano, and completed his expansive compos-
ition "Aventures" (Concerto for Bassetto and Orchestra) in January 2005. It is to be hoped that many more works by different composers will follow, which will give the instrument the position it deserves as a chamber music and solo instrument.

However, the bassetto has access to a very extensive repertoire through tran-
scriptions. A part of the repertoire for violoncello can be performed in this way (a fourth lower than in the original) and acquires a special colouring from the greater fullness of sound of the instrument. Even the literature of the violin offers a large number of possibilities for playing the works of great masters.

In chamber music compositions that are scored with two cellos (e.g. the Schubert quintet), the second cello can be replaced by a bassetto. This makes the ensemble sound fuller, more orchestral.  

Since it was only by way of the expanded tech-
nical possibilities of the "New Dutch School" that the approach to the bassetto opened up for me,
a command of this technique is a sensible basis for learning the bassetto. There are alternatives, but they seem to me to be cumbersome. I con-
sider the four-finger technique to be essential – after all the other string instruments that are tuned in fifths are played in this way. With the Simandl technique, too many position shifts
would be necessary. Thus, for example, to play
a two-octave D major scale (ascending and descending) with the three-finger technique would require eight shifts, while with the four-finger technique it needs only two! Of course not all keys can be managed so conveniently, but the bassetto is relatively comfortable to play; in my opinion more comfortable than the fourths-tuned double bass. (This is particularly the case when an instrument with a shorter scale is used.) In particular, the strings speak significantly better, and less pressure is necessary (with the right hand as well as with the left) because the strings are thinner. Also not to be underestimated is the excellent playing feel that results from the superb resonance provided by the high fifths tuning G-D-A-E. With this, still more sound "comes back" than with the
C-G-D-A tuning, which is in its turn more resonant than the E-A-D-G and F#-B-E-A tunings. (www.silviodallatorre.com) 

THOMAS MARTIN says:

"We all must thank you, Dear Vito, for your tireless work for all of us bassists!"  You are doing so much for your colleagues and your art.

prof.dr. Vito Domenico Liuzzi "Doctor of Law" -"Magna cum Laude"

dr. Vito Liuzzi
dr. Vito Liuzzi

TRANSLATOR

*** The Cd of the year ***

CATALIN ROTARU plays on TESTORE by BOTTESINI !!! "Lord of the basses"

CATALIN ROTARU "Sonic Bridges" vol.II (HR)

"Andante Affettuoso" di ROSANNA CARNEVALE

Ricordando Giuseppe Maria MARANGONI (1866-1945) "Anna e Pietro si lasciano andare in una esecuzione sul filo della memoria di una musica ormai totalmente interiorizzata e si guardano, di tratto in tratto, in una straordinaria muta conversazione d'intenti.

DOMINIK WAGNER

The fist CD of this great talent
The fist CD of this great talent

DIEGO ZECHARIES

"A TRIBUTE TO TEPPO" - Teppo Hauta-aho "THE KING" by Nbbrecords

DAN STYFFE "Octophonia" NEW CD

THIERRY BARBE'

CATALIN ROTARU or "The PAGANINI of the DOUBLE BASS"

MAURICIO ANNUNZIATA & ALL HIS COMPOSITIONS for Doublebass and Orchestra (piano reduction) - FREE DOWNLOAD

Click on the image for the free download
Click on the image for the free download

MARCOS MACHADO & His New Book (VOL.1) for The Left Hand. HR!

SPERGER DUO - "Sonatas for Double Bass and Piano" with PILIP JARO & Xénia Jarovà

GOLDBERG VARIATIONS

PINO ETTORRE

LEON BOSH

BOTTESINI

ALBERTO BOCINI

DAN STYFFE

DAXUN ZHANG

MARCOS MACHADO

METAMORFORA
METAMORFORA

JOEL QUARRINGTON

Garden Scene
Garden Scene

ORAZIO FERRARI

Pino Ettorre plays Gasparo da Salò on Youtube or here !!!

MICHAEL WOLF

MICHAEL WOLF BOOK, if you like click on to Schott Edition
MICHAEL WOLF BOOK, if you like click on to Schott Edition

 

PIERMARIO MURELLI

PIERMARIO MURELLI - "Nuova didattica per contrabbasso " Ed. RICORDI

ALFREDO TREBBI

ALFREDO TREBBI - Novissimo manuale semiserio per contrabbasso (click on the picture above to read more)
ALFREDO TREBBI - Novissimo manuale semiserio per contrabbasso (click on the picture above to read more)

RICCARDO CROTTI

GEIRD REINKE

BOGUSLAW FURTOK

ENRICO FAGONE

IRINA KALINA GOUDEVA

MICHAEL KLINGHOFFER

ALFRED PLANIAVSKY

MAURIZIO TURRIZIANI

THE BASS GANG

Thomas Martin & Timothy Cobb

SILVIA MATTEI

HR
HR

THE BASS SONORITY

THE BASS SONORITY: Vito Liuzzi, Michele Cellaro, Vincenzo Chiapperini, Leonardo Presicci, Giuseppe Lillo, Giovanni Rinaldi
THE BASS SONORITY: Vito Liuzzi, Michele Cellaro, Vincenzo Chiapperini, Leonardo Presicci, Giuseppe Lillo, Giovanni Rinaldi

DONOVAN STOKES

STEFANO SCODANIBBIO

Dead in Macerata at 55 years old

CATALIN ROTARU

FEDERICO BAGNASCO

CLICK ON THE PHOTO TO BUY
CLICK ON THE PHOTO TO BUY

ALFREDO TREBBI

Lo Zen e l' arte di imparare uno strumento
High Recommended

THOMAS MARTIN & his "Requiem" by Bottesini

PAOLO BENELLI

Dragonetti: Solos for double bass

by PAOLO BENELLI for CARISCH
by PAOLO BENELLI for CARISCH

FEDERICO BAGNASCO

Cd

MICHELE VERONESE

CATALIN ROTARU

Cd/DVD

PAOLO BENELLI

World Premiere!

FRANCESCO FRAIOLI

DAN STYFFE

"Portraits for friends" by BERNARD SALLES

BASSIONE AMOROSA

IRINA-KALINA GOUDEVA

"Recomenzar El Infinito"

Mr. PETRU IUGA "invention" !!!

Vito Liuzzi !!

Rino Liuzzi in STUDIOS

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